NEWS

NSF MRI grant received:
A $350,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (matched by $150,000 from UMaine) was received in Fall 2019 under the major research instrumentation (MRI) program to fund the acquisition of a high-performance computing instrument to support deep learning, modeling/simulation, and visualization for STEM at UMaine and across the region. The PI was Roy Turner, with co-PIs Bruce Segee (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Peter Koons (Earth and Climate Sciences), Huijie Xue (Marine Sciences), and Sofian Audry (now in Communications and Media at Clarkson University); there were ~30 senior personnel from across the state also involved.
Textbook published:
A textbook for COS 140 written by two MaineSAIL members, Roy Turner and Elise Turner (deceased), has been accepted for publication by Top Hat Monocle (Toronto, Canada). The book, Foundations of Computer Science, will be available electronically on the Top Hat marketplace after Fall 2019.

Students: If you are interested in being part of the lab, please send email to Roy Turner once the fall semester starts and we’ll add you to the list to get notifications. Lab meetings will likely be via Zoom or other online means this fall.

Welcome to MaineSAIL, the Maine Software Agents and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. The laboratory, part of the School of Computing and Information Science, is the center of research in general artificial intelligence and multiagent systems at the University of Maine.

Broadly, the research in MaineSAIL falls into several AI focus areas: intelligent control of real-world agents; context-sensitive reasoning; and the organization and reorganization of multiagent systems. Our domain for projects in these areas tends o be controlling autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and multi-AUV systems. In addition, other work in our lab focuses on computer science education, literate programming, and computational ecology. For information about all MaineSAIL projects, see our projects page.

The lab, founded in 1989 at the University of New Hampshire (as the Cooperative Distributed Problem Solving Research Group), was created in large part to involve students in research. This continues to be a strong focus of the lab now. In addition to graduate students, the lab provides research experience for undergraduates doing senior or honors projects, Work Merit experience, independent study projects, and, when funding permits, paid work as research assistants. If you are a student and would like to get involved with the lab, see the description of student research opportunities on our projects page.